Jj Abrams On The Ending Of Lost

With “Lost,” because you knew what (executive producers) Damon [Lindelof] and Carlton [Cuse] were going to be doing, as the selesai season was playing out, were there moments of real excitement and joy, as you learned what was going to happen?

JJ: With this season, they’re doing some amazing, intricate stuff that’s really unexpected and very different, in a lot of ways. The way that it’s going to conclude is consistent with their unbelievable track record of brilliant storytelling, that’s really surprising in ways that are mind-bending, which is the thing about the show that I think they’ve done so wonderfully.

Is the end of the series what you thought it would be, from the beginning?

JJ: Oh, no way! No. There are little threads and elements, here and there, but truthfully, when we started it, we didn’t know exactly what was in the hatch. We had ideas, but we didn’t know to what extent it would be. The notion of The Others was there, but we didn’t know exactly what that would mean. Damon hadn’t come up with the idea of flash forwards yet. To see where we are and what they’ve created is insanely gratifying and it’s something that no one could have predicted, at the beginning of it. The evolution of it is really part of their glorious experiment of taking a show that we were all, at the beginning, saying, “How do you make this a series?,” and to see what Damon and Carlton have done is amazing to me.

You had the idea for the basis of it though, right?

JJ: There were a lot of ideas, but the specificity with which the thing played out was part of that leap of faith that it was going to work. That doesn’t mean that you plan everything out. You have big ideas, but when the better bigger ideas show up, you go with them.

What have you learned from “Lost” that you can take to other genre shows?

JJ: “Lost” is a special example. It’s hard to know. You could say that you shouldn’t get too intricately serialized because, at a certain point, it’s difficult. But, the truth is, I don’t know if Lost would have worked, if it had been anything else, and I don’t know how you would apply that to another show.

If the minutia and mythology hadn’t worked with the viewers, would you have tried to change “Lost,” or would you have just walked away?

JJ: It’s hard to imagine the alternate universe version of “Lost” where you think, “Oh, that’s the version that is the other way to tell the story.” It really does feel like the trajectory that was started had no obvious place to go. Over time, they created this amazing narrative that is really just a result of that leap of faith and trusting that the characters will tell us what the show is, as much as anything. Damon and Carlton really did an amazing job.

With ABC announcing an end-date so far in advance, did that help immeasurably, in terms of the storytelling?

JJ: That’s something that Damon and Carlton insisted upon. They said, “Tell us how fast we’re running, so that we know what the end-game is and where the finish line is.” If you don’t know whether it’s 10 seasons or 6 seasons, you’re spinning your wheels. I’m thrilled to see billboards that say, “The Final Season.” You don’t see that very often. To know that it’s a show that’s going to end on its terms means that there will be a sense of inevitability to it, and not a sense of a series reacting to a marketplace or a viewership. It’s really cool.

How satisfying do you think this selesai season will be for those who have followed the show since the beginning?

JJ: I think it will be really bittersweet. While I think it will be very satisfying, I also think it’s going to be the end of something that, for the cast and everyone involved, has been a magical ride. So, the idea that it’s ending is a little sad, but it’s much better to end this way than to have it be, “You should have ended two years ago.” I believe it will be a satisfying ending, for sure.

Source: Full Interview @ Collider

Live Blogging From The Lost Tca Press Tour

Update: 17:55 They have also confirmed that we will get some new images before the premiere.
Update: 17:50 Only spoilers so far that I can work out is the confirmation that both Michael and Libby will be back

Thanks to SL-Lost for setting this up. I’m posting it in spoilers in case any spoilers come out during the talks.

Panel is now over. You can replay/review all the posts below.

Latest From Kristin – Tca Tour Snippets – 12Th Jan 2010

Here are some snippets from a recent E!Online article. Here are the spoilerly parts. Note: It looks like they might have their episode numbers a bit mixed up as Episode 6.11 is being filmed now 😉 unless they are making it up as they go along lol

CARLTON CUSE
What about Maggie returning as Shannon?
We would love to have Maggie Grace back, but she’s very busy—she’s got a movie career. We would love to work it out and have her back on the show, and we’ve talked to her; we’re just trying to get that worked out.

When in season six will Harold Perrineau and Cynthia Watros be appearing?
In the latter half of the season.

Do you have plans to bring Charlie back?
Yes, Dominic Monaghan is back for four episodes this season.

Malcolm David Kelley is the big question I have…
Well, Malcolm is very tricky because of the age thing, and it makes it very hard for him. We would love to have him back, but he has aged and looks older than his character. So that’s the duduk masalah with him, so we’re still trying to see if there’s a way to work that out.

Will the clips from Comic-Con—the Mr. Cluck’s commercial and the Kate crime feature—make sense once we’ve seen the premiere, or will we have to wait to fit them into the mythology?
I think they will start to make sense after the premiere, but it will take a number of episodes for them to fully make sense.

What about the Helen episode with Katey Sagal?
That comes up in the first third of the season.

Obviously, you can’t answer every single question, but some things like the numbers—
No, obviously, if we said nothing about the smoke monster, if we said nothing about the numbers, we would be killed, but we believe that we recognize what the major questions are, and we will be providing some answers to those questions.

Where are you in terms of writing the episodes?
We are in the middle of writing episode 11, prepping episode 12 and we’re writing episode 13.

How quickly does Claire come back?
I can’t say.

What is the vibe of the simpulan season?
I’d say it’s a lot like the vibe of first season—the actors talk a lot about how they’ve reconnected with each other—there’s almost a nostalgic quality. I think the first season of any show, the actors get together, they bond, and then there’s a drift over time. But because the show has an end, the actors have a chance to sort of rebond, much like they did in the first season when they screened the episodes every Wednesday at each other. There’s a real sense that the connections between these characters is a huge part of the show: Why did these characters cross [paths with] each other?

DAMON LINDELOF
Are you worried the show will jump the shark?
I think that the show has jumped the shark at least a dozen times now, and fortunately for us, the storytellers, but unfortunately for a mainstream audience, yes, absolutely there was a time 23 million people were watching Lost, and that time has passed. Every time this show takes a risk, declares itself more overtly, there are going to be people saying, “I wasn’t watching a show about time travel. I don’t like that show. I don’t want to watch that anymore.” But we want to tell the story that we’re committed to, and hopefully the audience will stick with us. We can’t really comment past that.

How will this finale compare to other recent series finales?
I think that The Shield was a phenomenal series finale, and certainly Newhart is one of my favorites, but my all-time favorite series finale is M*A*S*H. I remember watching that with my folks; I remember everyone on our street was watching it. I remember Hawkeye basically saying, “It was a baby, it wasn’t a chicken, it was a baby,” and how emotional it was when the chopper finally lifted off and Klinger stayed behind; it stayed with me for my life. I feel like to end a show that people do care about and to give the characters incredibly fulfilling resolutions, M*A*S*H is the pinnacle of something we’re trying to achieve. That being said, it wasn’t a mystery show, so we’ve got to answer all our mysteries and give the audience a satisfying character conclusion, so I’d like to say for the record that our degree of difficulty is very high.

JOSH HOLLOWAY
What happens to Sawyer this season?
They’ve kept me in the dark since day one; I don’t know, and I don’t want to know. I’m spoiled now with not having to study much, just get it and go.

Source: E!Online

Episode 6X11 – Filming Update And Set Video

Here are some more details from Ryan about today’s filming.

If you missed the set pics, there was a stunt scene being filmed with a car flipping into the marina. Stand-ins for both Charlie and Desmond were spotted on set and apparently the first run at the stunt did not work well as a cable pulling the car snapped, but the second take was successful and fans were able to catch the action via video.

Here is a set video from LOST Locations and update from Ryan:

It was only after the stunt, and after a lunch break, that the context of the scene became clear. Seated in the ill-fated car were Desmond (Henry Ian Cusick) and Charlie (Dominic Monaghan), perhaps not long after Charlie’s release from the airport holding cell and their subsequent conversation in a bar. Desmond is driving. The pair are arguing. Suddenly, Charlie grabs the wheel from the passenger seat and yanks, and his impulsive act is what sends their vehicle into the ocean.


Full Report: Hawaii Blog
Posted By: The ODI

Cast Interviews From The Tca Press Event

Update: 12:45 Here is another set of short interviews. Thanks to deej240z for the video.here.
Update: 9:00 Thanks to Congested and Jennifer for this Menang Ceme interview with Jeff Fahey

Interview

I’ve not had a chance to watch them all yet so will post in spoilers just in case. Interviews below with Josh Holloway, Michael Emerson



Episode 6.11 – Happily Ever After – Set Report – 13Th Jan 2010

Update: 14th Jan Thanks to Ryan for this update.

UPDATE: Or maybe not. Piecing together separate reports, it was not a wedding, after all… which might explain why no one saw a bride or groom all day! But there’s a reason why someone might get that impression.

The scene was instead a big-ticket fundraiser for the “Golden Gate Natural History Museum” (or something to that effect), featuring a concert, hence the stage. Parked at the entrance, black limousines and Town Cars with California plates, as well as the silver sedan that Desmond was driving in yesterday’s dramatic shoot.

The fundraiser was being hosted by Eloise, and Desmond was apparently crashing the party, looking for Penny. He tries to read the guest list, but Eloise takes it away. She rebuffs him, and he barks, “For what?” He then storms off.

Work continued past the museum’s closing time, so who knows what followed. But why the early impression that the scene involved a wedding? Apparently, some of the crew were referring to Eloise not as “Mrs. Hawking,” but as “Mrs. Widmore.”

 which might explain why no one saw a bride or groom all day Episode 6.11 - Happily Ever After - Set Report - 13th Jan 2010
More Photos Here

Source: Hawaii Blog

Update: 21:30 Ignore the update below. I misread a spoiler from a source that said Hawking and Wimore are already married. Not sure yet who is getting married in this scene. My Apologies. We’ll update when we know more
Update: 20:55 According to one of my source the Wedding is between Hawking and Widmore but this is not 100% confirmed.

Thanks again to Ryan for pulling together these filming reports.

While additional shooting takes place this morning at the Ilikai Marina, continuing the big stunt scene from yesterday, local blogger GeeWhy of Pulpconnection broke the news of a concurrent “LOST” location shoot on Twitter and with a blog post. The scene, fortunately, is considerably more low key than yesterday’s. In fact, it’s downright ceremonial.

The “LOST” crew took over the “Great Lawn” at Bishop Museum, setting up for a wedding scene. Fortunately, my family are members and regular visitors to the museum, and my wife and daughter just happened to be there today. A stage was set up to host a band. Jack Bender was running the show, with Jean Higgins by his side. The first actor on the set was Henry Ian Cusick (Desmond), dressed up and doing press interviews, but he was not the groom.

When Fionnula Flanagan (Ms. Hawking) showed up, flanked by a slight stand-in dressed in a tuxedo, the likely story became clear.

Source: Hawaii Blog